24th IATEFL Poland Conference
2015 Kraków

Meet Some of Our Speakers

Click here - Draft Programme
event-timetable-2015-09-18.pdf (90.2 KiB)

Professor David Little

David Little retired in 2008 as Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics at Trinity College Dublin. His principal research interests are the theory and practice of learner autonomy in language education, the exploitation of linguistic diversity in schools and classrooms, and the application of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages to the design of L2 curricula, teaching and assessment.
Friday, 18th September
Time: 13.50
Place: Lecture Hall 0.103

Title: Innovation and quality in language education: the case for learner autonomy

This talk will begin by arguing that autonomy is a universal human capacity, drive and need that has profound implications for the way in which we organize formal learning of all kinds. It will then describe classroom practice designed to exploit and further develop the autonomy of language learners, first at secondary school and then at university.

Péter Medgyes

Péter Medgyes, CBE, is Professor Emeritus of Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy. During his career he was a schoolteacher, teacher trainer, vice rector, deputy state secretary and ambassador of Hungary. He was a keynote/plenary speaker in 40 countries and author of numerous books and articles published both in Hungary and abroad.
Friday, 18th September
Time: 13.50
Place: Lecture Hall 0.102

Title: The fifth paradox – What's the English lesson all about?

This plenary challenges certain deep-set beliefs about language teaching. Namely, it claims that (a) foreign languages are unique subjects in the school curriculum; (b) learners have no messages to convey in the foreign language; (c) the foreign language is an inadequate means of communication; (d) the foreign language lesson is not suitable for creating life-like situations; (e) the artificialities of the foreign-language class can only be endured if both teacher and learners suspend their beliefs in normalcy and join the language learning circus.

Sunday, 20th September
Time: 11.20
Place: Lecture Hall 0.104

Topic: Elfies at large – Beware!

It is common knowledge that English has become the Lingua Franca the world over. Today the overwhelming majority of communication takes place between non-native users of English, often in the absence of native speakers. Given this, proponents of the ELF movement, whom I call elfies in my lecture, claim that native English standards need not be followed any longer. After I have subjected this assumption to critical analysis, I conclude that teachers had better follow their own agenda and satisfy their learners’ genuine needs, instead of listening to elfies – or any other researchers, for that matter.

Jamie Keddie

Jamie Keddie is a teacher, teacher trainer and writer. He is the founder of LessonStream.org, and the winner of a British Council ELTons award. Jamie’s areas of interest include the use of visual materials, storytelling and video technologies. His publications include 'Images' (OUP 2009) and 'Bringing online video into the classroom' (OUP 2014). He is also the author of 'Videotelling', an ebook which is to be published in 2015.
Friday, 18th September
Time: 18.15
Place: Lecture Hall 0.102

Title: Video and video narratives

In this workshop, we will deconstruct three videos which are short in length but strong in narrative. We will consider a number of principles which aim to engage students and get them talking. We will also see how video recording devices (tablets, mobile phones, etc.) can be used to complement and enhance the teaching and learning.

Saturday, 20th September
Time: 10.15
Place: Lecture Hall 0.103

Title: The teacher as a storyteller

Teacher-led storytelling is often associated with young learners. But we are considering a classroom art which is far too versatile and valuable to be associated exclusively with one group alone. Quite simply, storytelling is for everyone. In this practical talk, I would like to refer to three short stories as a way to suggest a number of approaches, techniques, possibilities, problems and solutions.

Steve Taylore-Knowles

Steve has spent over twenty years in ELT as a writer, a trainer, an examiner and a teacher. He has created a number of best-selling courses for teenagers and adults, including most recently Open Mind (Macmillan 2014), which includes life skills as an integral part of the course. He regularly speaks at events throughout the world on various aspects of English language teaching and learning.
Friday, 18th September
Time: 18.15
Place: Lecture Hall 0.103

Title: Skill and sub-skill: making skills teachable and learnable


Our students need to develop skills of different kinds, from language skills to life skills. In this hands-on workshop, we'll consider what's involved in breaking these skills down into teachable and learnable chunks and how specific task sequences work to develop these skills. We’ll look in detail at the skills involved in developing reading and writing.

Saturday, 19th September
Time: 11:40
Place: Lecture Hall 0.104

Title: Study Work, Life: Developing transferable skills across domains


The development of a range of skills that will make students more employable in an unpredictable, rapidly evolving future cannot be separated from the development of their competence in English. We'll consider the types of skill that are required before looking in detail at how they can and should be closely integrated into language work.

Piotr Bucki

Piotr is an architect who does not design, academic teacher who does not fit schemes, communication fanatic addicted to analyses and social psychologist always looking for WHY? He considers himself a modern day Hermes – a researcher who combines different inspirations to come up with new solutions. He collects ideas and merge them into new ones. And he loves to build it all on solid neuroscientific base. As a freelance consultant, Piotr works with companies, offering them support and a bit of a struggles with communication strategies. He also teaches and train in a wide range of communication related areas. Marketing, PR, Branding, UX, Copywriting.Piotr works mainly in Marketing and R&D but he also teaches at 3 different universities. He worked with Maleman and Dolce Vita lifestyle magazines. www.bucki.pro

Friday, 18th September
Time: 18.15
Place: Lecture Hall 0.101

Title: Teach me how to pitch. How to use language and cognitive psychology to win the show


Learning how to pitch in either business or scientific environment becomes one of the most crucial yet most neglected communicational skills. The art of perfect pitch – be it elevator pitch or simply a business presentation – should be learned and practice throughout the whole educational process. crafting the pitch requires skills and the knowledge that is deeply rooted in neuroscience and practical aspects of linguistics. Combining the science and practice guarantees effects that match the market demand in every area our students will set to conquer. I feel obliged to help them conquer it once for all.

Marjorie Rosenberg

Marjorie Rosenberg is a lecturer at the University of Graz, trains teachers and works with corporate clients. She has published Business English materials with CUP, Pearson, and National Geographic Cengage and is the author of 'Spotlight on Learning Styles (Delta Publishing). Marjorie is currently the IATEFL President.
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 09.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.103

Title: Making your lessons memorable


There are many way to make lessons memorable and help your learners take valuable information with them. In this plenary we will look at ideas to help you liven up your lessons, make them fun, relevant, engaging, and creative so that both you and your learners feel you have gotten the most out of the face-to-face time you spend together.

Prof Izabela Szymańska

Prof Izabela Szymańska is Associate Professor at the Institute of English Studies, University of Warsaw. Her research interests include theoretical and contrastive linguistics, and translation studies, especially the interface between linguistic and cultural aspects of translation and translating for children. Author of the monograph Mosaics. A Construction-Grammar-Based Approach to Translation (2011); co-organiser of “Scotland in Europe” conferences.
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 09.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.102

Title: Translators' Adventures in Aliceland. 150 Years of Challenge and Inspiration.


This presentation will explore Alices’ Adventures in Wonderland 150 years after its first publication, showing what makes this book so memorable, important and inspirational for world culture until today. It will also survey the history of the Polish translations of Alice, highlighting the challenges this book poses to translators and the changing approach to translating for children in general.

Nick Michelioudakis

Nick Michelioudakis (B. Econ., Dip. RSA, MSc [TEFL]) has been working in the field of ELT for many years as a teacher, examiner and teacher trainer. He has given numerous presentations both in Greece and abroad working for publishers and examination boards. He has written extensively on Methodology, though he is better known for his ‘Psychology and ELT’ articles which have been published in many countries. He likes to think of himself as a ‘front-line teacher’ and is interested in one-to-one teaching and student motivation as well as Social and Evolutionary Psychology. For articles or worksheets of his, you can visit his blog at www.michelioudakis.org.
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 09.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.105

Title: Presentation Skills


Presentation skills are necessary for personal and professional development. We give presentations to communicate ideas, persuade or to present information. In this talk we will be focusing on the various types of presentation, why we give presentations and the proper structure we should follow in order to obtain the best possible feedback from our audience. Public speaking can be intimidating, but with the proper preparation and the awareness of what makes a presentation successful, it becomes less of a challenge.

Lewis Lansford

Lewis Lansford began teaching in Barcelona in 1989. After earning an MA in TESOL (University of Arizona, 1991), he taught academic, professional and technical English in the US and Japan before moving into publishing in 1995 as an editor in Hong Kong. He has worked on materials at all levels for learners globally. He is a co-author of National Geographic Learning new course KEYNOTE, based on TED Talks. Learn more at lewislansford.com
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 10.15
Place: Lecture Hall 0.102

Title: Fighting the many-headed hydra: Coping with specialization in ELT


English language study is becoming increasingly specialized earlierand earlier in the curriculum – English for academic purposes, engineering English, English for the tourist industry, and so on. With so many highly specific uses for English, how can teachers possibly give learners adequate preparation? Where can teachers find appropriate authentic input? How can real English be delivered at lower levels? This talk considers needs analysis and the broad base of skills and abilities that all learners need to develop, no matter where they’re going with English.

JJ Wilson

JJ Wilson has lived in Egypt, Lesotho, Colombia, the UK, Italy and the US, where he is the writer-in-residence at Western New Mexico University. He teaches Linguistics, ESL Methods, and Writing. His publications include Total English, Active Listening, How to Teach Listening, and Speakout. He also writes fiction, and his novel, "Damnificados", will be published in January 2016.
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 10.15
Place: Lecture Hall 0.101

Title: Mentors, Myths and Memories: The Dream Lives of Teachers


To grow as professionals, we need to understand our lives as teachers and examine the different paths we might take. What type of teacher are you? What type would you like to be? What can you do to get there? Through the lens of personal narrative, we will explore our identities as teachers and look at different ways of developing.

Richard Rossner

Richard Rossner is Chair of Eaquals. He has been involved in language education for over 40 years, including as Chief Executive of Bell International and then Executive Director of Eaquals. Richard has worked on various language education projects on behalf of Eaquals, and is a member of Council of Europe's organising group on the linguistic integration of adult migrants.
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 10.15
Place: Lecture Hall 0.104

Title: The quality imperative: aims, processes and instruments


Everyone is convinced of the need to maintain and develop quality in language education, and committed to ensuring that learners have excellent language learning support. But what practical steps can be taken by organisations, managers, teachers and learners to deliver quality? This presentation will outline an all-round approach to quality, and illustrate the processes and tools that can be used.

Piotr Steinbrich

Piotr Steinbrich is an academic and teacher trainer at KUL and Pearson. Tonya Trappe is a course book writer, teacher trainer, actress and theatre school owner. Both have extensive experience in teaching EFL and teacher training.
Piotr Steinbrich & Tonya Trappe

Saturday, 19th September
Time: 15.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.102

Title: A Brief History of Time from the Classroom Perspective


In this, rather non-academic, presentation, we will go through a journey in time, looking at various models of teaching EFL, paying special attention to what has remained in the modern classroom and what bearing it may have on learning and teaching. With the teachers and the students literally on stage, everything will be illustrated on the spot, leaving it for the audience to decide what is worth using and what is not.

Gareth Davies

Gareth Davies has been in ELT since 1996 teaching in many different environments. Between 2002 and 2007 Gareth ran a Trinity CertTESOL course and since 2005 he has delivered teacher training for OUP. Gareth has contributed material to titles including Solutions and Headway. He is also an author of fiction and likes developing creative writing ideas for the English classroom.
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 15.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.101

Title: Revolutionise your listening lessons


When I started teaching I used a cassette player for listening activities. No wonder students struggled to understand the texts. Nowadays, I can use a range of digital resources, but have these technologies improved the learning experience? In this session we will look at how to use the technology at our disposal to improve the listening experience for our students.


Dr Grzegorz Śpiewak

A graduate of University of Essex, UK (MA in Linguistics), and University of Warsaw (Ph.D in English & Linguistics). Teacher of English, consultant, project manager, teacher trainer, acclaimed conference speaker, author. Currently affiliated with Macmillan Education (Head ELT Consultant, key teacher trainer). An Honorary President and advisory board member of IATEFL Poland.

 Saturday, 19th September
Time: 15.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.105
 

Title: Teaching - and Learning - English with the Brain in Mind


This practical session is about how the teenage brain actually learns a foreign language. Based on research into brain-friendly language learning, I’ll show you a number of fresh activity types that really engage students’ brains, raise their curiosity for language, appeal to their emotions, and get them to remember a lot more of what we’ve taught them.

Hugh Dellar

Hugh Dellar is a teacher and teacher trainer at University of Westminster, London. He has been teaching since 1993, predominantly in London, but spent three years in Jakarta, Indonesia. He gives teacher training and development talks all over the world. He is the co-author of the Outcomes and Innovations series, both published by National Geographic Learning, as well as the online teacher development course, Teaching Lexically. In 2015 a second edition of Outcomes will be published by National Geographic Learning. Visit Hugh at www.lexicallab.com , a blog which he runs with his friend and co-author Andrew Walkley.
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 15.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.104

Title: Smooth sailing through the sea of words


This session explores how easy it is to end up with a limited grasp of vocabulary frequency because of our availability bias. It also shows how lexical sets can lead to the teaching of infrequent and unhelpful. We'll consider in more depth the examples we give, how to adapt lexical sets and better use of dictionaries, texts and word lists.

Sunday, 20th September
Time: 09.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.104

Title: Planning for success


When planning lessons, we need to take a wide range of often competing factors into consideration: our learners and their backgrounds and interests, expectations and exam systems, length and frequency of classes and so on. In this talk, I’ll be suggesting that the two most crucial aspects of planning involve ensuring a consistent thread across lessons and preparing to explore and exploit the language that’s there in materials you are using. We’ll look at practical examples of how this might be done - and discuss how such planning not only helps bring classes to life, but also aids improvisation and spontaneity in the classroom.

Dr Marzena Żylińska

Dr Marzena Żylińska zajmuje się metodyką i przenoszeniem wniosków płynących z neuronauk na grunt edukacji. Jest autorką materiałów dydaktycznych. Propaguje wprowadzenie do szkół nowej, opartej na wnioskach płynących z badań nad mózgiem, kultury edukacyjnej. Jej marzeniem są szkoły, do których zarówno uczniowie, jak również nauczyciele chodzą z prawdziwą radością i które każdemu dziecku dają możliwość budowania wiary we własne możliwości. Współautorka projektu „Uwierzyć w siebie!”, którego celem jest tworzenie kultury doceniania i budowania na silnych stronach i talentach uczniów. Do 2014 roku wykładowca metodyki w Nauczycielskim Kolegium Języków Obcych w Toruniu, obecnie pracuje w firmie Young Digital Planet w Gdyni. Współorganizowała europejski projekt „Zmieniająca się szkoła”, obecnie współtworzy inicjatywę „Budząca się Szkoła”. Jest autorką książek „Między podręcznikiem a internetem” (Warszawa 2013) i „Neurodydaktyka. Nauczanie i uczenie się przyjazne mózgowi”(Toruń 2013). Prowadzi blog „Neurodydaktyka, czyli neurony w szkolnej ławce”: https://osswiata.pl/zylinska/.
Sunday, 20th September
Time: 09.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.103

Title: Nauczanie języków obcych w świetle badań nad mózgiem


Wiedza o mózgu powinna być dla nauczycieli tym, czym dla lekarzy jest znajomość anatomii.
Od około 20 lat dzięki metodom neuroobrazowania możemy bezinwazyjnie zaglądać do wnętrza mózgu i podglądać zachodzące w nim procesy. Nasz mózg to niewyobrażalnie złożony narząd. Chociaż jesteśmy dopiero na początku drogi prowadzącej do poznania tajemnic mózgu, to jednak badacze już dziś potrafią powiedzieć, co wspiera, a co utrudnia lub wręcz hamuje naturalne procesy uczenia się. Są również w stanie wyjaśnić przyczyny wielu problemów, z którymi borykają się dziś nauczyciele. Dotyczy to np. motywacji. Zrozumienie mechanizmów sterujących procesami uczenia się pozwala nauczycielom na lepszą organizację procesu uczenia się, a autorom materiałów dydaktycznych na tworzenie przyjaznych mózgowi materiałów. Wnioski płynące z badań nad mózgiem pozwalają na zrozumienie przyczyn niskiej efektywności nauczania języków obcych (badanie European Survey on Language Competences czy raport dotyczący osiągnięć uczniów kończących gimnazjum w roku 2014). Zarówno leksyki, jak również gramatyki można uczyć się w sposób jawny lub utajony. Dziś w szkołach wykorzystywany jest tylko jeden z tych kanałów. Oceniając efektywność materiałów dydaktycznych warto wiedzieć, czym jest głębokość przetwarzania informacji i jaki jest jej związek z zapamiętywaniem nowych informacji.

Dr Monika Cichmińska

Dr Monika Cichmińska has been teaching English for 20 years. After graduating from the University of Łódź, in 1999 she finished her doctorate in linguistics and moved to Olsztyn, where she works at the University of Warmia and Mazury. She also works for English Perfect, a private language school in Olsztyn, where she is the Director of Studies.
Sunday, 20th September
Time: 09.00
Place: Lecture Hall 0.102

Title: Learning English, learning life - on the power of stories


We are creatures of stories. Book, songs, TV series, on-line games – are all stories. Psychologists call stories “flight simulators of human life”: they train us to deal with the challenges of the world around. This session will focus on how important and beneficial stories are - as sources of the language we teach and tools developing imagination, creativity and reasoning.

Dr Joanna Femiak

Psycholog i filozof, trener z rekomendacjami  Polskiego Towarzystwa Psychologicznego I Stopnia, Międzynarodowy Trener Videotreningu Komunikacji (VIT), Absolwent Szkoły Trenerów Treningu Interpersonalnego. Wieloletni trener, coach i doradca ds. zarządzania personelem wiedzy. Podczas swoich szkoleń łączy umiejętności psychologa, praktykę trenera z wiedzą pięknej dziedziny, jaką jest filozofia. Maksyma, która jej towarzyszy w pracy i życiu to: "Co sobie uświadamiasz to kontrolujesz, to, czego sobie nie uświadamiasz kontroluje ciebie" A. de Mello. Doktorat obroniła na Akademii Wychowania Fizycznego w Warszawie. Bada zagadnienia związane z edukacją dorosłych, samoświadomością i szeroko rozumianym rozwojem. W Personnel Training Institute  monitoruje działalność merytoryczną Instytutu, czuwa nad jego rozwojem. Autor  cyklu szkoleniowego: Szkoła Przewodnika Talentów, Akademii Zarządzania dla Właścicieli Szkół Językowych.

Sunday, 20th September
Time: 10.15  
Place: Lecture Hall 0.101

Temat: Motywacja wewnętrzna nauczyciela fakt czy iluzja? Czyli o tym, co daje radość, energię, sens - i nie prowadzi do uzależnień:)

Współczesny nauczyciel jest przesycony metodyką, obarczony wymaganiami prawnymi, oczekiwaniami rodziców i jednocześnie bardzo osamotniony.
Będąc narzędziem, które ma generować efekty w szkolnictwie prywatnym i państwowym - podlega bardzo szybko wypaleniu zawodowemu i obniżeniu motywacji.
Stan w jakim jest nauczyciel, ma ogromne znaczenie nie tylko dla niego ale i dla każdego słuchacza, z którym się spotyka.
Nasze spotkanie ma dać Państwu radość, poczucie dumy i sensu.
Poznacie także metody zadbania o własny dobrostan w relacji edukacyjnej, podczas której oddajecie to, co macie najcenniejszego dzieciom i dorosłym.
Zapraszam serdecznie.

Sandie Mourão

Sandie Mourão is a teacher educator, author and educational consultant. She has a PhD in didactics and teacher education and researches and writes about language learning in pre-primary contexts, as well as the use of picturebooks in language education for all ages. Sandie has a website http://sandiemourao.eu/pages/ and keeps a blog http://picturebooksinelt.blogspot.pt/
Sunday, 20th September
Time: 11.20
Place: Lecture Hall 0.102

Title: Issues of quality in pre-primary language teaching


English is now compulsory in the last year of pre-primary education in Poland. This presentation will first look at the issues of quality and pedagogy related to making such a move. Then, I will present a number of practical ideas that can contribute to ensuring quality and a pedagogically suitable approach for this age group is achieved.

Geoff Tranter

Geoff has been involved in vocational, further and higher education for many years both on the teaching and testing side, and is a regular speaker at IATEFL events. One of his main interests is how to personalise and individualise language teaching in order to make classroom work more relevant and more motivating for learners, particularly in Business English and ESP.

Friday
PCE ESP Lecture Hall 0.101

 
Saturday, 19th September
Time: 16.20
Place: Lecture Hall 0.105

Title: Business English? What Business English? Whose Business English?


Business English seems to cover a ‘multitude of sins’ when you look at the courses and materials on offer. This ‘one size fits everything’ approach offers little for learners seeking language/communication skills at their own particular workplace. This talk will address one specific BE area –international project management – and identify appropriate tasks that teachers can use in the classroom.

Sunday, 20th September
Time: 13.40
Place: Lecture Hall 0.103

Title: Lots of Laughter = Lots of Language = Lots of Learning:-))


Humour is an important tool for language teaching - not only as a resource for creating a positive atmosphere and helping learners to relax in the classroom. Humour also helps to promote the emotional side of learning. This practical workshop will offer a variety of easy-to-use ideas for all age groups at all levels, including Business English courses.

International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language

is the organiser of the IATEFL Annual Conference:  

  • Three days of intensive training seminars, plenaries, and discussion groups, live lessons with learners
  • 120+ workshops on new teaching trends and techniques
  • Presentations given by top ELT specialists and writers- meet them in person!
  • Thousands of recent ELT publications on display & sold at generous discounted rates
  • High-quality daytime and evening social programmes
  • Approx.1,000 participants each year
  • Numerous opportunities to make new friends & forge useful business contacts
  • Over 100 items in the free prize draw including summer training courses in Great Britain
  • Wide-range of accommodation organised near the Conference venue to suit your tastes!
  • Up-to-date information and materials available on exam courses and professional bodies
  • Supportive and friendly atmosphere, aided by active monitors and IATEFL Help-desk

 

Contact:
E-mail:  conference@iatefl.org.pl
Telephone:  (048) 510865100

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